Mother's Day Sale is LIVE. Avail up to 40% OFF on select products. Also get flat 10% OFF on your first order. Use code 1STORDER

0

Your Cart is Empty

March 24, 2023

HISTORY

Dokra (also spelt as Dhokra) is non-ferrous metal casting using the lost-wax technique. This method of metal casting of lost-wax is also called cire-perdue, in which a molten metal is poured into a mould that has been created by means of a wax model method of metal casting. It was first practiced during Indus Valley era around 2500 BC and has been used in India for over 4000 years and is still used. One of the earliest known lost-wax artefacts is the dancing girl of Mohenjodaro. The art Dokra is named after a nomadic tribe called “Dokra Damar”, the art of Dokra was originally found in the region from Bankura to Dariyapur in Bengal, and across the metal-rich regions of Odisha and Madhya Pradesh.

 

The artefacts are made of Brass and are unique in a way that the pieces do not haver any joints. The method is combining metallurgical skills with wax techniques employing the lost-wax technique, a unique form where mould is used only once and broken, making this art the only one-of its kind in the world. The technique was used thousands of years back to cast non-ferrous metals like copper to make artefacts. Some old artisans also used alloys like brass or bronze. Brass is a miniature of zinc and copper while bronze is an alloy of tin and copper.

MAKING

Artisans use a mixture of bee’s wax, resins from the tree ‘Damara Orientallis’ and nut oil to make soft dough. This mixture is passed through sieves to attain homogenous thickness and then rolled into long strands. The coiling effects gives Dokra figurines their characteristic feature. Further ornamentations are done by carving on the wax. Dry soils of server types are then sprinkled on the wax model.

Fine riverbed soil and coal dust mixture forms the first layer on the wax model, as this mixture creates the textures and shapes of the wax, resulting in a perfect inner wall of the mould. Second coat of red-soil and rice husk mixture is applied to it, which helps in the toughening of the outer surface. When the model is complete, two holes are made at once end and wax sticks are put into these holes to provide a passage for the molten inner wax and air bubbles upon heating.

Fine riverbed soil and coal dust mixture forms the first layer on the wax model, as this mixture creates the textures and shapes of the wax, resulting in a perfect inner wall of the mould. Second coat of red-soil and rice husk mixture is applied to it, which helps in the toughening of the outer surface. When the model is complete, two holes are made at once end and wax sticks are put into these holes to provide a passage for the molten inner wax and air bubbles upon heating.


Subscribe